Lesson 10

Compare Drawings

Warm-up: Questions About Us: Pets? (10 minutes)

Narrative

The purpose of this warm-up is for students to consider concepts of number in a familiar context. Students may use the structure of the chart and the 5-frames to determine how many students made each choice (MP7). Students have an opportunity to hear and practice the count sequence. Adjust the context and choose a different question with 3 possible responses to better reflect students’ interests and experiences as needed.
MLR8 Discussion Supports. Display an image or drawing of each type of pet above the corresponding 5-frame. Invite students to respond to the question using the sentence frame, “My favorite pet is a . . .”
Advances: Speaking, Representing.

Required Materials

Materials to Copy

  • Questions About Us Chart 5-Frame Template

Required Preparation

  • Cut out enough 5-frames to make a chart with a space for each student to answer the survey question.

Launch

  • Groups of 2
  • Display Questions About Us chart.
  • “Which pet is your favorite: dogs, cats, or rabbits?”
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • Record each student’s choice with a circle in a 5-frame.

Activity

  • “How can we figure out how many students chose dogs?”
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • 30 seconds: partner discussion
  • Share responses.
  • Demonstrate or invite students to demonstrate counting.
  • “How many students chose dogs?”
  • “How many students chose cats?”
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • Share responses.
  • “How many students chose rabbits?”
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • Share responses.

Student Response

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Activity Synthesis

  • “What was different about the question that we answered today?” (There were 3 choices instead of 2.)

Activity 1: Apple Slices for a Picnic (10 minutes)

Narrative

The purpose of this activity is for students to solve Add To, Result Unknown story problems. In the synthesis, students determine which drawing shows what happens in the story problem (MP2). 

Required Materials

Launch

  • Groups of 2
  • Give students access to connecting cubes or two-color counters.
  • Display image. 
  • “What do you notice? What do you wonder?” (There are 3 people. They are having a picnic. There are sandwiches.)
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • Share responses.
  • “Have you ever had a picnic in the park? What kinds of things did you bring to the picnic?”
  • Read and display the task statement.
  • “Tell your partner what happened in the story.”
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • 1 minute: partner discussion
  • Monitor for students who accurately retell the story. Choose at least one student to share with the class.
  • Reread the task statement.
  • “Show your thinking using drawings, numbers, words, or objects.”

Activity

  • 2 minutes: independent work time
  • 2 minutes: partner discussion

Student Facing

 

PIcnic outside. 3 people. 1 man, 2 boys. Making a sandwich. Eating a sandwich. Apples in a basket.

There were 3 apple slices at the picnic.

Tyler's dad brought 5 more apple slices to the picnic.

How many apples slices are there now?

Handwriting lines.

Student Response

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Advancing Student Thinking

If students take our more or fewer than 8 counters or other math tools, consider asking:

  • “Can you use your counters to tell me what happened in the story?”
  • “There were 3 apple slices at the picnic. Which counters show the 3 apple slices that were at the school? Which counters show the 5 more apple slices that Tyler’s dad brought to the picnic?”
     

Activity Synthesis

  • Draw and display 5 apple slices.
    Sample drawing.
  • Draw and display 3 circles and 5 circles.
    Sample drawing.
  • “Which drawing shows what happens in the story? How do you know?” (The circles show what happened in the story. First there were 3 apples slices and then Tyler's dad brought 5 more apple slices.)
  • “There were 3 apple slices at the picnic. Then Tyler's dad brought 5 more apples slides to the picnics. 3 apple slices and 5 apple slices is 8 apple slices. We can write that as ‘3 and 5’ or ‘\(3 + 5\)’.”

Activity 2: Compare Drawings (10 minutes)

Narrative

The purpose of this activity is for students to compare two drawings that represent the story problem in the previous activity. Students notice that it can be easier to see how an organized representation connects to the story problem (MP6).

Representation: Access for Perception. Make connections between representations visible. Use gestures or add details to the display (different colors or markings) to show how each drawing shows what happened in the story.
Supports accessibility for: Organization, Visual-Spatial Processing

Launch

  • Groups of 2
  • “Andre and Noah both drew pictures to show what happened in the story problem.”
  • If needed, reread the story problem from the previous activity:
  • “There were 3 apple slices at the picnic. Tyler's dad brought 5 more apple slices to the picnic. How many apples slices are there now?”

Activity

  • Display Andre’s representation.
  • “How does Andre’s drawing show what happened in the story?”
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • 1 minute: partner discussion
  • Share responses.
  • Display Noah’s representation.
  • “How does Noah’s drawing show what happened in the story?”
  • 30 seconds: quiet think time
  • 1 minute: partner discussion
  • Share responses.
  • If needed, ask “Why do you think Noah drew a line in the middle of his circles?”

Student Facing

Andre and Noah both drew pictures to show what happened in the story problem.

Andre
Circles, 8.

Noah
3 circles, a line, 5 circles.

Student Response

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Activity Synthesis

  • Display both representations.
  • “What is the same about Andre and Noah’s drawings?” (They both show 8 circles. They both show 3 apple slices and 5 more apple slices.)
  • “What is different about Andre and Noah’s drawings?” (Andre’s circles are messy. Noah’s are in a line. It’s easier to see the 3 apple slices and the 5 apple slices in Noah’s drawing. Noah’s drawing is easier to count.)

Activity 3: Introduce Bingo, Add and Cover (25 minutes)

Narrative

The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to stage 3 of the Bingo center. Students roll 2 cubes onto a dot mat and count to determine the total number of dots. Students place a counter on any squares that show the same total.

After they participate in the center, students choose from any stage of previously introduced centers.

  • Math Fingers
  • Math Stories
  • Subtraction Towers
  • 5-frames
  • Counting Collections

Required Materials

Materials to Gather

Materials to Copy

  • Bingo Stages 1-3 Gameboard
  • Dot Mat 1-5 (dots and 5-frames)

Required Preparation

  • Each group of 4 students needs 2 connecting cubes.
  • Gather materials from: 
    • Math Fingers, Stages 1-3
    • Math Stories, Stages 1 and 2
    • Subtraction Towers, Stage 1
    • 5-frames, Stages 1 and 2
    • Counting Collections, Stage 1

Launch

  • Groups of 4
  • Give each group of students 2 connecting cubes, two-color counters, and a dot mat. Give each student a gameboard
  • “We are going to learn a new way to do the Bingo center. It is called Bingo, Add and Cover.”
  • Display a dot mat 1-5.
  • “I’m going to roll 2 cubes onto the mat. Then I need to figure out how many dots I have altogether.”
  • Demonstrate rolling 2 cubes onto the mat.
  • “How can I figure out how many dots I have altogether?” (You can count all of the dots. You can just see that there are 2 and 2, which is 4.)
  • Display gameboard.
  • “I have 4 dots altogether. Now I need to cover all of the squares on my gameboard that also have 4 things. Which squares should I cover?”
  • “Take turns rolling the cubes onto the mat, then each person covers the squares on their mat. The game ends when someone has 4 counters in a row.”

Activity

  • 8 minutes: partner work time
  • “Now you can choose another center. You can also continue playing Bingo.”
  • Display the center choices in the student book.
  • Invite students to work at the center of their choice. 
  • 10 minutes: center work time
  • If time, invite students to choose another center.

Student Facing

Choose a center.

Bingo

Center. Bingo.

Math Fingers

Center. Math Fingers.

Subtraction Towers

Center activity, Subtraction Towers.

5-frames

Center. 5 frame.

Math Stories

Center. Math Stories.

Counting Collections

Center. Counting Collections.

Activity Synthesis

  • “What materials do you need to play Bingo? Where can you find the materials? When you are finished playing, where do you put the materials?”

Lesson Synthesis

Lesson Synthesis

Display Andre and Noah’s representations from the second activity.
Andre
8 circles, scattered.
Noah
8 circles organized.

“Which drawing makes it easier to see what happened in the story? Why?”

If needed, ask “Which drawing makes it easier to see which apple slices were at the picnic first and which apple slices Tyler's dad brought to the picnic?”

“When we organize our drawings, it can make it easier to see what happened in the story.”

Cool-down: Unit 4, Section B Checkpoint (0 minutes)

Cool-Down

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