Lesson 18

Scaling Two Dimensions

18.1: Tripling Statements

CCSS Standards


Building On

  • 6.EE.A

Warm-up: 5 minutes

The purpose of this warm-up is for students to explore how scaling the addends or factors in an expression affects their sum or product. Students determine which statements are true and then create one statement of their own that is true. This will prepare students to see structure in the equations they will encounter in the lesson. Identify students who:

  • choose the correct statements (b, c)
  • pick numbers to test the validity of statements
  • use algebraic structure to show that the statements are true

Ask these students to share during the discussion.

Launch

Arrange students in groups of 2. Give students 1–2 minutes of quiet work time followed by time to discuss their chosen statements with their partner. Follow with a whole-class discussion.

Receptive Language: Processing Time. Read all statements aloud. Students who both listen to and read the information will benefit from extra processing time.

Conceptual Processing:
  • Processing Time. Check in with individual students, as needed, to assess for comprehension during each step of the activity.
  • Eliminate Barriers. Allow students to use calculators to ensure inclusive participation in the activity.

Student Facing

$m$, $n$, $a$, $b$, and $c$ all represent positive integers. Consider these two equations: $$m=a+b+c$$ $$n=abc$$

  1. Which of these statements are true? Select all that apply.
    1. If $a$ is tripled, $m$ is tripled.
    2. If $a$, $b$, and $c$ are all tripled, then $m$ is tripled.
    3. If $a$ is tripled, $n$ is tripled.
    4. If $a$, $b$, and $c$ are all tripled, then $n$ is tripled.
  2. Create a true statement of your own about one of the equations.

Student Response

Details about student responses to this activity are available at IM Certified Partner LearnZillion (requires a district subscription) or without a subscription here (requires registration).

Activity Synthesis

Ask previously identified students to share their reasoning about which statements are true (or not true). Display any examples (or counterexamples) for all to see and have students refer to them while sharing. If using the algebraic structure is not brought up in students’ explanations, display for all to see:

  • If $a$, $b$, and $c$ are all tripled, the expression becomes $3a +3b+3c$, which can be written as $3(a+b+c)$ by using the distributive property to factor out the 3. So if all the addends are tripled, their sum, $m$, is also tripled.
  • Looking at the third statement, if $a$ is tripled, the expression becomes $(3a)bc$, which, by using the associative property, can be written as $3(abc)$. So if just $a$ is tripled, then $n$, the product of $a$, $b$, and $c$ is also tripled.

18.2: A Square Base

CCSS Standards


Addressing

  • 8.F.A.3
  • 8.F.B

Activity: 15 minutes

The purpose of this activity is for students to examine how changing the input of a non-linear function changes the output. In this activity, students consider how the volume of a rectangular prism with a square base and a known height of 11 units changes if the edge lengths of the base triple. By studying the structure of the equation representing the volume function, students see that tripling the input leads to an output that is 9 times greater. In the following activity, students will continue this thinking with the volume function for cylinders.

Identify students who make sketches of the two rectangular prisms or write expressions of the form $99s^2$ or $11(3s)^2$ to describe the volume of the tripled rectangular prism.

Launch

Give students quiet work time. Leave 5–10 minutes for a whole-class discussion and follow-up questions.

Conceptual Processing: Manipulatives. Provide manipulatives (i.e., snap cubes to build rectangular prisms) to aid students who benefit from hands-on activities.

Student Facing

Clare sketches a rectangular prism with a height of 11 and a square base and labels the edges of the base $s$. She asks Han what he thinks will happen to the volume of the rectangular prism if she triples $s$.

Han says the volume will be 9 times bigger. Is he right? Explain or show your reasoning.

Student Response

Details about student responses to this activity are available at IM Certified Partner LearnZillion (requires a district subscription) or without a subscription here (requires registration).

Activity Synthesis

Select previously identified students to share whether they think Han is correct. If possible, begin with students who made sketches of the two rectangular prisms to make sense of the problem.

Ask students: “If this equation was graphed with edge length $s$ on the horizontal axis and the volume of the prism on the vertical axis, what would the graph look like?” Suggest that they complete a table showing the volume of the rectangular prism when $s$ equals 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 units (the corresponding values of volume are 11, 44, 99, 176, and 275 cubic units) and then sketch a graph using these points. Give students quiet work time and then select a student to display their table and graph for all to see. Ask students what they notice about the graph when compared to the graphs from the previous lesson (the graph is non-linear—the volume increases by the square of whatever the base edge-length increases by).

18.3: Playing with Cones

CCSS Standards


Addressing

  • 8.F.A.3
  • 8.F.B
  • 8.G.C.9

Activity: 15 minutes

In this activity, students continue working with function representations to investigate how changing the radius affects the volume of a cone with a fixed height. Students represent the relationship between the volume of the cone and the length of its radius with an equation and graph. They use these representations to justify what they think will happen when the radius of the cylinder is tripled. The work students did in the previous activity prepared them to use the equation to see the effect that tripling the radius has on the volume of the cone.

Identify students who use the equation versus the graph to answer the last question.

Launch

Give students 4–7 minutes of quiet work time followed by a whole-class discussion.

For students using the digital activity, they can generate their graph using an applet. 

Executive Functioning: Eliminate Barriers.Provide a task checklist that chunks the various steps of the activity into a set of manageable tasks.

Conceptual Processing: Eliminate Barriers. Assist students to see the connections between new problems and prior work. Students may benefit from a review of different representations to activate prior knowledge. Also, encourage students to sketch cylinders according to the description in the activity. Students may benefit from this visual as they create various representations of the situation.

Student Facing

There are many cones with a height of 7 units. Let $r$ represent the radius and $V$ represent the volume of these cones.

  1. Write an equation that expresses the relationship between $V$ and $r$. Use 3.14 as an approximation for $\pi$.
  2. Predict what will happen to the volume if you triple the value of $r$.
  3. Graph this equation.

  4. What happens to the volume if you triple $r$? Where do you see this in the graph? How can you see it algebraically?

Student Response

Details about student responses to this activity are available at IM Certified Partner LearnZillion (requires a district subscription) or without a subscription here (requires registration).

Activity Synthesis

The purpose of this discussion is for students to use the graph and equation to see that when you triple the radius you get a volume that is 9 times larger.

Ask previously identified students to share their graphs and equations. Display both representations for all to see, and ask students to point out where in each representation we see that the volume is 9 times larger. Ask students:

  • “If the radius was quadrupled (made 4 times as large), how many times as large would the volume be?” (The volume would be 16 times larger since $\frac13 \pi (4r)^2=\frac13 \pi r^2 4^2=16\boldcdot \frac13 \pi r^2$.)
  • “If the radius was halved, how many times as large would the volume be?” (The volume would be $\frac14$ times larger since $\frac13 \pi \left(\frac12 r\right)^2=\frac13 \pi r^2 \left(\frac12\right)^2=\frac14 \frac13 \pi r^2$).
  • “If the radius was scaled by an unknown factor $a$, how many times as large would the volume be?” (The volume would be $a^2$ times larger since $\frac13 \pi (ar)^2=\frac13 \pi r^2 a^2=a^2 \frac13 \pi r^2$.

If students do not see the connection between scaling the radius length with a known value like 4 and an unknown value $a$, use several known values to help students generalize that scaling the radius by $a$ scales the volume by $a^2$.

If time allows, ask students to compare this activity to the previous. How do the equations compare? How do the graphs compare? (In the last activity, the graph was sketched during the discussion.)

18.4: Halving Dimensions

CCSS Standards


Addressing

  • 8.F.A.3
  • 8.F.B
  • 8.G.C.9

Cool-down: 5 minutes

Launch

Student Facing

There are many cylinders for which the height and radius are the same value. Let $c$ represent the height and radius of a cylinder and $V$ represent the volume of the cylinder.

  1. Write an equation that expresses the relationship between the volume, height, and radius of this cylinder using $c$ and $V$.
  2. If the value of $c$ is halved, what must happen to the value of the volume $V$?

Student Response

Details about student responses to this activity are available at IM Certified Partner LearnZillion (requires a district subscription) or without a subscription here (requires registration).

Student Lesson Summary

Student Facing

There are many rectangular prisms that have a length of 4 units and width of 5 units but differing heights. If $h$ represents the height, then the volume $V$ of such a prism is

$$V=20h$$

The equation shows us that the volume of a prism with a base area of 20 square units is a linear function of the height. Because this is a proportional relationship, if the height gets multiplied by a factor of $a$, then the volume is also multiplied by a factor of $a$:

$$V = 20(ah)$$

What happens if we scale two dimensions of a prism by a factor of $a$? In this case, the volume gets multiplied by a factor of $a$ twice, or $a^2$.

For example, think about a prism with a length of 4 units, width of 5 units, and height of 6 units. Its volume is 120 cubic units since $4 \boldcdot 5 \boldcdot 6=120$. Now imagine the length and width each get scaled by a factor of $a$, meaning the new prism has a length of $4a$, width of $5a$, and a height of 6. The new volume is $120a^2$ cubic units since $4a\boldcdot 5a \boldcdot 6=120a^2$.

A similar relationship holds for cylinders. Think of a cylinder with a height of 6 and a radius of 5. The volume would be $150\pi$ cubic units since $\pi \boldcdot 5^2 \boldcdot 6 = 150 \pi$. Now, imagine the radius is scaled by a factor of $a$. Then the new volume is $\pi \boldcdot (5a)^2 \boldcdot 6 = \pi \boldcdot 25a^2 \boldcdot 6 $ or $150a^2 \pi$ cubic units. So scaling the radius by a factor of $a$ has the effect of multiplying the volume by $a^2$!

Why does the volume multiply by $a^2$ when only the radius changes? This makes sense if we imagine how scaling the radius changes the base area of the cylinder. As the radius increases, the base area gets larger in two dimensions (the circle gets wider and also taller), while the third dimension of the cylinder, height, stays the same.